Medicare Advantage

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Does Medicare Cover Hearing Aids? A Simple Guide for Seniors

As we get older, our hearing often starts to fade. You may notice everyone seems to mumble or your family members are always complaining about the tv volume. While this is a normal part of life, you may feel as if you’re missing out on important experiences. The simplest of activities can become tedious, and it can leave you feeling frustrated. Fortunately, thanks to advances in medical technology, you no longer have to suffer from your hearing loss. Today’s hearing aids work remarkably well, but they also come with a hefty price tag. Most Americans covered by Medicare might assume they can get hearing aids with minimal out-of-pocket costs — but does Medicare cover hearing aids?  Does Medicare Cover Hearing Aids? The Facts You Need to Know If you’ve noticed some problems with your hearing, you could take it upon yourself to have tests done and purchase hearing aids. However,…

Medicare Advantage Guide: What You Need to Know to Get the Right Coverage

Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a Medicare Advantage guide that explained what you need to know about Medicare Advantage plans? Great news, SelectQuote covers it all in the downloadable guide below. Medicare Advantage Guide Download this convenient Medicare Advantage guide to answer your questions about Medicare Advantage plans. Medicare Advantage plans are a popular choice for individuals looking to cover extra costs not covered by Original Medicare. Everything covered by Original Medicare is required to be included with a Medicare Advantage plan. One of the biggest benefits of supplemental plans, such as Medicare Advantage, is people spend less, on average, than those with Original Medicare. Once you’ve had a chance to review the information in the Medicare Advantage guide, contact your SelectQuote licensed agent to help you get started finding a Medicare Advantage plan that’s right for you. Related Articles How to Prepare When Shopping for Insurance With a…

How to Get Dental Coverage on Medicare

If you’re wondering how to get dental coverage once you’re on Medicare, look no further. Dental coverage is important when dealing with tooth decay, gum disease, receding gums and oral cancer. These are just four of the top dental problems experienced by older adults. Regular visits to your dentist help with prevention and early detection. This can save you pain and money down the road. In fact, the American Dental Association recommends visiting the dentist once or twice a year, if not more often. Luckily for those age 65 and older, dental coverage on Medicare comes with several options to protect both your oral health and your wallet. No Dental Coverage on Original Medicare Original Medicare – Parts A and B, don’t cover most dental services. Cleanings, fillings, tooth extractions, dentures, dental plates and other dental devices are 100 percent the responsibility of the patient under Original Medicare. Medicare Part…

What are Your Medicare Options at Retirement?

If you’re approaching retirement at age 65, now is the time to learn the basics of Medicare at retirement. To take full advantage of Medicare at retirement, take time to study your the different options. The more you know, the better you’ll manage health care costs in your retirement years. How to Enroll in Medicare at Retirement Most people are eligible for Medicare at retirement at age 65. Medicare enrollment steps depend on whether you currently collect Social Security or Railroad Retirement benefits. If you receive either, Medicare enrollment is automatic. If you don’t receive government benefits, you need to actively enroll in Medicare. For automatic enrollment, three months before your coverage begins, the government mails your Medicare card and a letter explaining benefits. If you’re turning 65 but do not receive Social Security or Railroad Retirement benefits, you need to actively enroll in Parts A and B. You have four options…

Understanding Medicare Enrollment Periods

Each year there are set times a person can enroll in Medicare or change existing Medicare plans. There are separate enrollment periods for Medicare Parts A and B (Original Medicare) and Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage). Medicare Enrollment Periods Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) – the first time an eligible person can enroll in Medicare Parts A and B. This timeline begins three months before the month of a person’s 65th birthday and continues through the three months after a person’s 65th birthday. Initial Coverage Election Period (ICEP) – the first time a newly eligible person can enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan. This often coincides with the Initial Enrollment Period. General Enrollment Period (GEP) – runs January 1 – March 31 each year and provides an enrollment opportunity for individuals who didn’t sign up for Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) when they were first eligible. Individuals may have…

Busting the Top 10 Medicare Myths

Healthcare is one of the single most expensive and important parts of your retirement. Most Americans don’t fully understand how Medicare works. Misunderstandings surrounding Medicare can be costly, so here are 10 of the most common Medicare myths. It’s checkup for your health and your money. Myth 1 – Medicare and Medicaid are the Same Thing They sure sound alike, but Medicare and Medicaid are actually two totally different programs. Medicare is a federal program that provides insurance to people ages 65 and older. Some people with disabilities or people who are on dialysis may also qualify for coverage. Since it is an insurance program, it runs similar to other health insurance coverage. Patients are usually responsible for deductibles and premiums, depending on your coverage. Medicaid is an assistance program that offers healthcare coverage for certain people of all ages based on various factors. Coverage is available to some low-income…

Vision Coverage on Medicare: What You Need to Know

Millions of Americans experience vision problems. This number continues to rise as the population ages. In fact, a study by the National Institutes of Health indicates that by 2050 the number of Americans with a vision problem will hit more than 8 million people, double what it is today. If you’re on Medicare and experience vision problems, you may be wondering about your coverage for eye exams and vision care. The risk of vision loss increases with age but most routine eye exams are not covered by Basic Medicare (Parts A and B). So what is covered and what do you need to know about your vision coverage on Medicare? What Eye Exams are Covered on Basic Medicare? Medicare Part A, or hospital insurance, does not cover eye exams or vision unless the treatment takes place during hospitalization. For example, if you experience trauma to the eye and go to…

Top 7 Questions to Ask When Shopping for Medicare

Cake. Balloons. Medicare?! Your 65 birthday represents a milestone in your retirement. When you turn 65 it’s your golden opportunity to select a Medicare plan to meet your needs. Medicare may seem complicated at first glance, but it doesn’t have to be. The help of a knowledgeable SelectQuote agent removes uncertainty when shopping for Medicare. He or she will simplify the process for your current and long-term healthcare needs. When purchasing your Medicare plan, it’s important to consider the plan premium and the value it provides. “Think about your healthcare long term,” advised David Perlberg, a licensed SelectQuote insurance sales agent. “The first time you enroll at 65 is the only time when you can gain Medicare Supplement insurance with no questions asked. If you decide to change your plan down the road, you’ll need to qualify medically for supplemental insurance. Many people can’t get the insurance they desire at…

What Medicare Covers When Traveling

What do most people say they want to do when they retire? Travel. Depending on your needs in retirement, your Medicare health insurance program may not make the best travel companion.  In the past, we’ve addressed in detail what Medicare A, B, C and D plans cover. Medicare Part A and Part B together cover essential medical scenarios such as hospital stays, doctor visits and medical equipment. Twist an ankle hiking and you may want those crutches. Whether at home or on the road, these are worthwhile services. But if you plan to travel quite a bit in retirement, let’s examine how Medicare meets — or doesn’t — your needs while away from home. When traveling, we enjoy indulging the senses. Often, this is where Medicare programs do a poor job serving as a healthcare concierge. We’ll use both domestic and international destinations to demonstrate some shortcomings in the plans. Santa…

How to Plan for the Medicare Annual Enrollment Period

Every year, the Medicare Annual Enrollment Period (AEP) or Open Enrollment kicks off Oct. 15 and closes Dec. 7. Whether you are newly eligible for Medicare or already in a plan, you’ll want to consider several items in preparation for the enrollment period. We outline steps to help ensure you get the most out of your planning. Already Enrolled in Medicare? The Medicare Annual Enrollment Period is an important time for you. Before the AEP starts, it’s always good to review your current needs and anticipate what you might need in the coming year. Perhaps you now need prescription drug coverage. If your current coverage is not providing everything you need, you can now modify your plans for next year. Or conversely, maybe you obtained services this year that are no longer of value. The AEP provides an opportunity to drop or switch plans. Furthermore, Medicare health and drug plans could…

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