June is National Safety Month

shutterstock_136103240The National Safety Council has named June National Safety Month, and that means safety in all its forms—at home, on the road, at work and at play. With all the distractions, vacations and general merrymaking that happens during summer, safety may not be at the front of anyone’s mind.

But there are plenty of reasons we should all be a little more vigilant. The Council has identified a number of key areas where greater mindfulness can drastically reduce the risk of death and injury, including:

Prescription Drugs

Accidental overdoses and poisoning from improper consumption of prescription medication has grown in recent years. Safe handling of medication means:

  • Using medications only as directed by a physician
  • Always following the recommended dosage
  • Keep medications in their original container, with child safety lids intact
  • Not taking medication with alcohol or sedatives
  • Properly disposing of any unused or expired medications
  • Understanding (and thus avoiding) dangerous drug interactions

Slips, Trips and Falls

One misplaced step is all it takes to break a bone…or worse. Here are some tips for avoiding these all-too-common accidents:

  • Remove tripping hazards (toys, boxes, shoes) from high-traffic areas, walkways and staircases.
    • Keep cords and cables under control and out of the way.
    • Use non-skid mats to secure small throw rugs. Slipping rugs are likely to cause falls, so consider removing them altogether.
      • Make sure walkways and steps are in good shape, and repair damages immediately.
      • Never stand on a chair, table or other surface that has wheels.
      • Clean up all spills immediately.

Safe Surroundings

Keeping hazards out of your living and workspaces is key to keeping everyone in the area safe.

  • Make sure pools and ponds are surrounded by child-safe gates — to prevent accidental drownings.
    • Childproof your home if you have children under age 5, and don’t leave them unattended.
    • Make sure smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are installed and have new batteries, and that fire extinguishers are accessible.
    • Repair and replace any faulty wiring.
    • Keep paint, bleach and other hazardous chemicals in clearly labeled containers safely stored where children cannot access them.
    • Pay attention: look where you walk, keeping an eye out for people and things in your immediate area. Take extra care if you are carrying a large box or something that obstructs your vision.
    • Don’t walk while reading or texting.

Motor Vehicles

Car crashes are one of the leading causes of death nationwide. To stay safe on the road, you should:

  • Make sure everyone in the car is wearing their seatbelt.
  • Place children in appropriate car seats for as long as possible, and have them ride in the back seat until they are 12.
  • Avoid aggressive driving (rapid and unnecessary lane changes, speeding, tailgating, running yellow lights).
  • Never, ever drive under the influence or when drowsy.
  • Never, ever talk on your cell phone or text while driving.

Reducing the risk of death and injury is something we all can do, and when we take steps to keep ourselves, and others, safe, everyone benefits. Stay safe this summer by following the guidelines above. As the National Safety Council likes to say, “Safety: It Takes All of Us.” Let’s all do our part.

SelectQuote wishes you a fun and safe summer.

 

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